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Musical World

Dmitri Hvorostovsky

  • Baritone

Reviews

Dmitri Hvorostovsky press reviews

"He is sending aficionados the world over into a collective swoon, inviting an adulation that recalls the advent of Baryshnikov in the dance world of the seventies." 
- VANITY FAIR 

"His fusion of sexiness, romantic angst, and just-plain-gorgeous voice are turning a whole new generation on to longhair music." 
- ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY 

"Dmitri Hvorostovsky's sleepy-eyed animality carries with it an air of danger reminiscent of Elvis Presley -- a rare quality in any performer, but even more so in the king of Romantic Opera. … this Siberian baritone is one reason opera audiences are getting younger, but it's the beauty of his voice -- refined and powerful -- that cuts across barriers of age and taste." 
- ELLE MAGAZINE

“Hvorostovsky is that rarity among artists -- somebody who burst forth like a blazing comet on the classical music scene but stayed around long enough to become a fixed planet. Most of the qualities that won him fame in the mid-1980s are still intact -- his dark and unmistakable voice, his leonine aura, the wild, fierce intensity of his interpretations. Yet his artistry has grown increasingly subtle. If Hvorostovsky, born and raised in the hinterlands of Siberia, once seemed a raw, prophetic voice crying (magnificently) in the wilderness, he is now one of the most elegant singers around.” 
- WASHINGTON POST

"One of the most remarkable international vocal careers of recent years. His voice is redolent of luxury: beautiful tone, pinpoint intonation, elegant, and impassioned delivery." 
- NEW YORK TIMES

“Genuine stars are rare in the classical music world, though Russian baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky ranks among them. He is glamourous and audiences love him. The moment he steps on to the platform there are cheers. …. staggering stuff, all of it, leaving you in no doubt that he is one of the great recitialists of our time.” 
- THE GUARDIAN 

“Though famous for his velvety lyric baritone and an unusually broad repertoire that encompasses Neapolitan folk songs and liturgical music Hvorostovsky is also opera’s reigning – and perhaps its one and only – hunk.” 
- W MAGAZINE

“Going on 47, Siberian baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky is a unique singer today, carefully managing his career and slowly adding challenging operatic roles to his repertoire all the while maintaining -- even building on -- his remarkable technical skills. Whether or not an opera company in a full staging would cloak his matinee-idol looks to play the title character, a hunchbacked and twisted court jester, Hvorostovsky made it clear that he can claim this key Verdi role musically, dramatically, innately.” 
- CHICAGO SUN TIMES 

“Hvorostovsky's tremendous success as a singer comes from four sources: stunning, profoundly beautiful vocal quality; instinctive musicality; obvious musical intellect; and that indefinable thing called charisma. In his case, movie-star good looks were lavished on an individual who shows incredible intelligence and talent with a voice that reverberated in Bass Performance Hall as if in a cathedral.” 
- STAR-TELEGRAM 

“All that the sultry, silver-haired Russian-born baritone had to do was stride onstage
and look at the actress playing Donna Elvira’s maid, and she began taking off her clothes. Many women in the audience would happily have followed suit.” 
- TOWN & COUNTRY 

"His rise has been meteoric and for a good reason ... I was at his Carnegie Hall recital and he had the audience absolutely mesmerized.  He's been compared with the presence of Rudolph Nureyev; he's called dashing and a heartthrob; he made the list of People Magazine's "50 Most Beautiful People"... all of that and he sings Tchaikovsky like a God." 
- CBS NEWS 

“As always he was a riveting actor. In the final scene, in which Boccanegra has been poisoned by an enemy, Mr. Hvorostovsky staggered about on two crutches, his head shaking, his eyes sunken, his voice aching, commanding the stage … his singing throughout was so tender and, when called for, volatile, that he made the tormented Boccanegra seem a profoundly tragic figure. And that’s not easy in this convoluted opera.” 
- NEW YORK TIMES 

"I can remember no more powerful performance of this scene ("Rigoletto") in more than 30 years of reviewing." 
- WASHINGTON POST 

"Move Over, Pavarotti. Dmitri Hvorostovsky is one of the new stars who are making opera glamorous again. His solo recitals have made him a superstar from Moscow to London, Buenos Aires to Tokyo." 
- TOWN & COUNTRY 

“Hvorostovsky was in great shape. His sounds was lustrous and even. His ability to convey the emotional point of words was a marvel. His stage presence was magnetic – even as another person sang. And, most admirably, he remained vocally true to himself.” 
- HOUSTON CHRONICLE

"His smouldering manner (in "Nozze di Figaro") gives off a sexual heat that burns up every female on stage. Women in the audience are advised against sitting in the front row in case they get their ears singed. Once into the drama, he reveals a latent viciousness that is quite frightening. And he sings the music magnificently. Hvorostovsky is -- in a word -- the best Count I have ever seen." 
- FINANCIAL TIMES 

“Mr. Hvorostovsky sang with urgency and haunting pathos, his admirable range of expressive and dynamic shadings aptly mirrored by Ivari Ilja, an exemplary accompanist.” 
- NEW YORK TIMES


“He had confidence, daring, exceptional technique and a caramel-colored voice that, if it were possible for a voice to float like a butterfly and sting like a bee, his could and did.” 
- WASHINGTON POST 

"The world's greatest baritone, Hvorostovsky, is sexy. In opera he's a dashing Don Juan or a roguish man about town like Figaro. At concerts, women are riveted by his Russian good looks, and his sensuous singing can make susceptible audience members swoon." 
- MIAMI HERALD 


“Dmitri Hvorostovsky could have sung C-major scales all night during his recital and the audience would have been in raptures. The Russian baritone actually worked within a  narrow range – the recital went from superb to stupendous.” 
- THE PLAIN DEALER 

"Siberian-born Dmitri Hvorostovsky is, without a doubt, a heartthrob of the opera world ... he was more than good in his solo recital debut at Orchestra Hall Sunday afternoon. His performance was one of the best concerts of the season ... it was a performance whose emotional intensity and technical mastery will linger long in the memory." 
- CHICAGO SUN TIMES

"The sheer beauty of Hvorostovsky's voice approaches legendary status." 
- SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER 

"How would Hvorostovsky fare with ebullient comedy ("Barber of Seville")? The answer is magnificently ... his sardonic glare is as seductive as most baritones' grins, and when he does break into a smile the effect is electrifying. Put that together with a gorgeously dark, burnished tone and a voice that moves freely and without strain through a broad range, and the result was an exquisite debut." 
- SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE  

"He sang a Mahler cycle in a way that suggested they are a deep part of his musical being. Hvorostovsky's voice has operatic power and heroic timbre." 
- PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER  

"Dmitri Hvorostovsky came to North Texas and brought with him a magnificent house gift ... It turned out to be one of the great song cycles of the 20th century... For the first time in memory, the long ovation was partly Russian style, with rhythmic hand-clapping led by Van Cliburn himself." 
- THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS

“Don Giovanni Unmasked.  Amid all this, baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky is mesmerizing as he tackles the dual roles of the title’s lecherous masked nobleman and his disapproving servant, Leporello, giving each part a distinct voice and personality.” 
- TV GUIDE