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Nathan Berg

  • Bass-Baritone

Reviews

Nathan Berg press reviews

"Berg's singing should give intense pleasure to any (Western) lover of the human voice" Financial Times, April 13, 1994 Elijah

“Bass Nathan Berg sang the all-important role of Elijah. He had just the right darkness of voice to suggest the sternness of the prophet combined with a certain liveliness of expression.” Richard Todd, The Ottawa Citizen, May 8, 2008

Thesée, Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, Paris “Nathan Berg brought a quality voice to the semi-serious roles [of Mars and Arcas]. ” Opera, April 2008

The Creation “Bass Nathan Berg intoned the music of Raphael and Adam with dark authority.” Lawrence A. Johnson, The Miami Herald, Nov 10, 2007

Verdi Requiem “Nathan Berg lent power and dignity to every episode in which he sang.” Richard Todd, Ottawa Citizen, Jun 1, 2007 Der Fliegende Holländer “Baritone Nathan Berg brought believability to [his] improbable role as the eternally wandering sea captain. It can't be easy to hold listeners' attention while standing rooted to one spot for much of the opera, but Berg pulled it off with keen musical and dramatic focus. Berg's vocally secure performance suggested not only the world-weariness that would come from decades, if not centuries, roaming the seas, but also a depth of poise and gravity that made even his quietest utterances compelling.” Catherine Reese Newton, The Salt Lake Tribune, Oct 15, 2007 “In the title role is baritone Nathan Berg. He has a wonderfully lyrical voice.” Edward Reichel, Deseret Morning News, Oct 14, 2007 Giulio Cesare, Glyndebourne Festival, August 2006 "Nathan Berg's Achilla catches the right mix of bluster, duplicity and compassion." Andrew Clements, The Guardian, 7 August, 2006 "...there are excellent performances from Nathan Berg’s Achillas - sure-toned, physically striking and brutal in his lust for Cornelia..." Edward Bhesania, The Stage, 9 August, 2006 “... brute machismo of Achilla (Nathan Berg)...” Anna Picard, The Independent, 13 August 2006 "...you can smell the danger in Mathan Berg's Achilla." Geoff Brown, The Times, 18 August, 2006 La Cenerentola, Glyndebourne Festival 2005 “But, as Nathan Berg's Alidoro showed, you do not have to be Italian to be elegant and warmly expressive.” Paul Griffiths, New York Times, May 24, 2005 “The character of the philosopher Alidoro - a commanding Nathan Berg - is literally given the moral authority of centre stage. He addresses us directly, as do all the characters. We are far from passive participants in this "pantomime".' Edward Seckerson, The Independent, May 23, 2005 “Nathan Berg's Alidoro and Simone Alberghini's Dandini are both superb.” Anthony Holden, The Observer, May 22, 2005 “The most interesting characters also receive the most satisfying performances - Nathan Berg is contained and slightly mysterious as Alidoro and Simone Alberghini's Dandini is detached yet controlling.” Andrew Clements, The Guardian, May 21, 2005 “Nathan Berg turns Alidoro into an operatic Prospero and sings with even authority.” Andrew Clark, Financial Times, May 21, 2005 Leporello, Don Giovanni “Nathan Berg brought a sturdy bass voice and delightful comic timing to the role of Giovanni's put-upon, scene-stealing servant Leporello, especially in his tour-de-force "cataloque aria," listing the Don's 2000-plus conquests.” Diane Windeler, San Antonio Express News, Oct 2006 “The Canadian singer Nathan Berg was a very solid Giovanni, bringing his hefty yet dexterous bass-baritone to the role of everyone's favorite debauched nobleman. He was at his most persuasively seductive in moments of suave understatement, when he would just sit back and reel in his fresh catch, like the innocent Zerlina…” Jeremy Eichler, Boston Globe, Oct 14, 2006 “Nathan Berg, as Don Giovanni, did the major work with aplomb…” Keith Powers, Boston Herald, Oct 14, 2006 “Nathan Berg, playing Leporello in all performances, earned prolonged ovations with a big, hearty voice, endless energy, and comic style that made it look easy.” David Mead, Austin American-Statesman, May 1, 2006 “Nathan Berg brought a sturdy bass voice and delightful comic timing to the role of Giovanni's put-upon, scene-stealing servant Leporello, especially in his tour-de-force "cataloque aria," listing the Don's 2000-plus conquests.” Diane Windeler, San Antonio Express, Apr 30, 2006 “Berg was a beguiling buffo as Giovanni’s often-betrayed butler.” AP Arts & Entertainment Review, Mar 11, 2002 “Berg boasts a first-class bass voice, both plush and resonant.” The Boston Globe, Apr 26, 1997 Marcello, La Bohème “Nathan Berg, on the other hand, has stage charisma to spare as Marcello. Berg has an excellent operatic bass voice, and he looks comfortable in his role as the volatile painter, on-again-off-again lover of the flamboyant Musetta. In Act 2, his brooding and exasperation at Musetta’s flirtations have just enough melodrama to get the array of emotions across without falling into hamminess. In his spat with Musetta in Act 3, which has a nice pace, Berg goes a step beyond into anger, and he finds those emotional notes convincingly. He’s known around here as an oratorio and recital singer. Opera is obviously his strength, as well.” Bill Rankin, EdmontonJournal Mar 20, 2006