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Richard Danielpour

  • Composer

Reviews

Richard Danielpour reviews

"Richard Danielpour is one of the busiest ­ and most popular ­ composers on the classical scene today. His Piano Concerto No. 3 ("Zodiac Variations"), helps explain why. It's a big, romantic, deftly constructed score."

THE SUN (Baltimore)

"He is an unabashed eclectic, infusing his magnificent central slow movement ["Metamorphosis"] with a moony late-romanticism, while goosing the agitated outer movements with a verve that almost outswaggers Leonard Bernstein. With his big, wide-open embrace, he seems entirely himself"

THE NEW YORK OBSERVER

"There can be no denying Danielpour's gifts, which are considerable. He writes well for the piano - had one not been looking at the stage, it would have been difficult to tell that the brilliant Graffman was only using one hand."

WASHINGTON POST

" ["Metamorphosis" for Piano and Orchestra] is a highly dramatic work whose busy, toccata-like percussiveness and direct emotional impact suggest Prokofiev without sounding at all like his music. At several points the work seems to catch fire."

STEREO REVIEW

"It's lyrical tranquillity shadowed by violent shifts of mood shows the composer's voice at its most compelling."

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

"The ethereal, expansive second part [of Symphony No. 3, "Awakened Heart"] borders on the sublime, with a setting of passages from the New Age book "A Course in Miracles" for chorus and soprano decorated by polytonal comments from winds and brass."

STEREO REVIEW

"Richard Danielpour's "First Light" is brilliantly orchestrated"

THE NEW YORK TIMES

"The discovery of Danielpour has been enjoyable. There is a literary base to almost all of Danielpour's works on the Delos symphonic release and companion Koch recording of the composer's chamber music. Perhaps the highlight of the symphonic disc is Symphony No. 3. Mysticism may not appeal to all, but the elegant performance by the [Seattle Symphony] orchestra, its Chorale, and satin-voiced soprano Faith Esham, is a treasure."

NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE

"Perhaps not since Aram Khachaturian has such exotically colored music come along [Cello Concerto]. It all comes to a great rackety end, and had the audience on its feet cheering."

AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE

"The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center has commissioned many works from American composers, but it's safe to say none has been more distinguished than Richard Danielpour's "Sonnets to Orpheus". Danielpour is an outstanding composer for any time - one who knows how to communicate deep, important emotions through simple, direct means that nevertheless do not compromise with complicated, contemporary thought. Danielpour has offered a major addition to the vocal-instrumental repertory."

THE NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

"Danielpour, long considered one of this country's best composers, has produced the finest new concerto this listener has heard in years [Cello Concerto for Yo Yo Ma]. It was not diminished by a program that included what are perhaps the two greatest concertos in the cellist's repertory, the Dvorak and the Elgar. This piece is profoundly moving; it seizes the listener by the throat and does not let up. "

THE SUN (Baltimore)

"Danielpour's vibrant "Metamorphosis" draws freely on the impatient jazz rhythms of early Bernstein, the lyricism of Copland's prairie style and even a touch of Shostakovich's bitter edge while somehow maintaining an original impulse throughout. It's a drama with an almost narrative thrust drawing its power from a tense commingling of the polished and the brash, the kinetic and the introspective."

THE NEW YORK TIMES

"The [cello] concerto is eclectic and profoundly romantic in its mood swings. It is a work of a brilliant composer, who is unafraid to let his emotions show and who posses the skill to bring off grand orchestral effects".

MERCURY NEWS (San Jose, CA)

"His cello concerto for Yo Yo Ma should speak eloquently to a music-loving generation that has grown suspicious of academic formulas, a generation that expects spiritual engagement as well as craft from its musical fare."

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER